OUTCOME 5

Career Readiness

BALTIMORE'S PROMISE HAS A GOAL THAT

Youth Earn Quality Post-Secondary Credentials or Receive Training and are Career Ready

Research shows that education directly impacts poverty and unemployment. A bachelor’s degree has also been linked with longer life expectancy, lower incarceration rates, and greater civic engagement. Similarly, an individual with appropriate training (via apprenticeships or formal skills training programs) has increased chances of securing employment and earning a living wage. Individuals with professional certifications or licenses earn more than individuals without those credentials at each level of education below a bachelor’s degree. Providing youth with the skills, knowledge, and experience relevant to the current demand for workers will help to ensure that those youth will have the opportunity to begin successful careers and earn a living wage.

Baltimore’s Promise has identified post-secondary enrollment, the six-year college graduation rate for Maryland four-year public institutions, and the youth unemployment rate as the key indicators for this outcome area.

Key Metrics

Postsecondary enrollment.

In 2014, 52.0% of Baltimore City Public Schools graduates enrolled at a postsecondary institution within 16 months of high school graduation.

Statewide six-year college graduation rate for Maryland's four-year public institutions.

In 2014, 40.3% of students graduated within six years of college enrollment.

Youth unemployment rate.

In 2014, 20% of youths aged 16 to 24 were not attending school, not working, and did not possess degrees beyond high school.

College Enrollment

About half of high school graduates from Baltimore City Public Schools enroll in college within 16 months of graduating.

High School Graduates Who Enrolled in College 16 Months Post High School

 

High School Graduates Who Enrolled in College 16 Months Post High School

Females across Maryland and in Baltimore City enrolled more frequently than males over the last decade, but the gap there appears to be closing. In a racial and ethnic context, the groups with the lowest percentages of enrollees in 2014 were blacks and Hispanics, both in Maryland and in Baltimore City.

High School Graduates in the Class of 2014 Who Enrolled in College Within 16 Months by Gender and Race/Ethnicity

 

High School Graduates in the Class of 2014 Who Enrolled in College Within 16 Months by Gender and Race/Ethnicity

Degree Completion

Post-secondary education and skills training can improve a wide range of life outcomes. Recent studies show that as many as 78% of future jobs will require training and or education beyond a high school diploma. Additionally, annual earnings increase significantly, as individuals attain post-secondary education, with annual income almost doubling between those possessing a high diploma and those possessing a bachelor's degree.

In the Baltimore City region, careers in healthcare comprise the largest share of mid-skilled job opportunities, defined as jobs requiring skills above a high school diploma but less than a bachelor's degree. Additionally, Baltimore City Public Schools graduates who enroll in college struggle to complete degrees.

First-time, Full-time Undergraduates Completing a Degree Within Six Years of Enrollment

(By Institution Type)

First-time, Full-time Undergraduates Completing a Degree Within Six Years of Enrollment

Between 2010 and 2014, the median income for Baltimoreans with bachelor’s degrees was about 40% higher than for those with only high school diplomas.

Median Earnings by Education Level

 

Median Earnings by Education Level

Between 2010 and 2014, women with high school diplomas and bachelor’s degrees in Baltimore City earned less than men with the same levels of education.

Differences Between Median Earnings Among Female and Male Graduates in Baltimore City

Differences Between Median Earnings Among Female and Male Graduates in Baltimore City

Opportunity Youth

Providing youth with the skills, knowledge, and experience relevant to the current demand and need for workers will help to ensure that those youth will have the opportunity to begin successful careers and earn a living wage. The percentage of Baltimore City youth who are not attending school, not working, and do not possess a post-secondary degree is higher than their state counterparts.

One in five young people ages 16-24 (approximately 18,000 young people) are disconnected from work and school in Baltimore City.

Young Adults 18-24: Not Attending School, Not Working, and No Degree Beyond High School

(Baltimore City & Maryland)

Young Adults 18-24: Not Attending School, Not Working, and No Degree Beyond High School